Bishnupriya Manipuri in Barak Valley to hold 101 hr Rail blockade

Bishnupriya Manipuri in Barak Valley to hold 101 hr Rail blockade

A 101 hr rail blockade has been declared by five major Bishnupuria Organisations starting from December 21 in Barak valley to demand reservation of seats in the assembly and in the Lok Sabha for their community.

According to Subal Sinha, President of All India Bishnupriya Manipuri People’s Mahasabha they have total seven demands for which this protest has been initiated and that on December 16 the organization will also hold a bike rally in Silchar in continuation with their protest. Continue Reading

Source and Origin of Bishnupriya Manipuri

The Bishnupriya Manipuri Language comes under the group of Indo-Aryan languages.

The structure of the language is undoubtedly of Indo-Aryan origin, but it also retains some older sounds of medieval Meitei. The vocabulary is influenced by many Indo-Aryan and Tibetan-Burmese terms. There are many theories in regard to the source and origin of Bishnupriya Manipuri. Continue Reading

Dialects of Bishnupriya Manipuri

Bishnupriya Manipuri has two dialects, namely –

(1) Rajar Gang ( Kings Village) and
(2) Madoi Gang ( Queens village ).

The Madoi Gang dialect also known as Leimanai and the Rajar Gang dialect, as Ningthounai. The term Leimanai derived from Leima (queen) + nai (attendant), and the word Ningthounai from Ningthou (king) + nai (attendant). Continue Reading

Population using Bishnupriya Manipuri language

Population using Bishnupriya Manipuri language

3,00,000 in Assam
60,000 in Tripura
5,000 in Jiribam (Manipur)
12,000 in Ningthaukhong (Manipur)
10,000 in Bishnupur (Manipur) Continue Reading

Places Where Bishnupriya Manipuri is Spoken

Bishnupriya Manipuri was originally confined only to the surroundings of the Lake Loktak in Manipur.

The principal localities where this language was spoken are now known as Khangabok, Heirok, Mayang Yamphal, Bishnupur, khunan, Ningthankhong, Ngakhong,Thamnapoxpi and so on. However, later a great majority of speakers fled away from Manipur and took refuge in Assam,Tripura, Sylhet and Cachar during eighteen and nineteenth century due to internal conflicts among the prices of Manipur and due to Burmese attack. Continue Reading

The ” Manipuri” Question

In the post Sixties, with the power of the Manipur State behind them, the Meitei clan has been waging an organized campaign to discredit and disown the Bishnupriya counterparts.

There have been suggestions that Bishnupriya was never the language of Manipur and Meitei is the “Real” Manipuri language. These assertions are contradicted by historical and anthropological evidence. Unfortunately, some writers have repeated the ‘Official’ Manipuri line without thought or reason. Continue Reading

Manipuri denotes two linguistic groups: Meitei and Bishnupriya Manipuri

The Manipuris, from a linguistic point of view, are divided into two groups, namely – the Meiteis and the Bishnupriyas.

The Meiteis entered Manipur from the east; their Language is of the Tibeto-Burman group. The Bishnupriyas entered Manipur from the west; their language is of the Indo-Aryan group. “Manipuris are divided into two main tribes – the – khalachais, who call themselves Bishnupriyas, are supposed to have been the first cultural race and the Meitheis or Meetheis, who call themselves real Manipuris are supposed to have been next immigrants.”- said Shri R. M. Nath in his Book The Background of Assamese culture. Continue Reading

Bishnupriya Manipuri – A language originated in Manipur

Works of both Indian and European Scholars bear testimonies to the existence of Bishnupriya Manipuri in Manipur in the earliest time.

The “Khumal Purana” Of Pandit Navakhendra Singh refers to the existence of Bishnupriya Manipuri language in Manipur during the reign of Garib Nawaj. Pandit Navakhendra states – ” The main stream of Manipuri, the Aryan origin people, the khumal, Moirang, Angam and Luwang who are following the Vedic cult from the epic ages being the devotees of Lord Vishnu distinguish themselves from the Meitheis”.  The language originated and developed in Manipur and was originally confined to the surroundings of the Loktak Lake. Continue Reading

Manipuri denotes two linguistic groups: Meitei and Bishnupriya Manipuri

The Manipuris, from a linguistic point of view, are divided into two groups, namely – the Meiteis and the Bishnupriyas.

The Meiteis entered Manipur from the east; their Language is of the Tibeto-Burman group. The Bishnupriyas entered Manipur from the west; their language is of the Indo-Aryan group. “Manipuris are divided into two main tribes – the – khalachais, who call themselves Bishnupriyas, are supposed to have been the first cultural race and the Meitheis or Meetheis, who call themselves real Manipuris are supposed to have been next immigrants.”- said Shri R. M. Nath in his Book The Background of Assamese culture.  Continue Reading

The Bishnupriya Manipuri Language

Bishnupriya Manipuri Language is mainly spoken by Bishnupriya Manipuris, a Indo-Aryan group of people who lived in Manipur(A North Eastern state of India)

long before the advent of Hinduism mixing and intermingling racially and culturally with the Meiteis but were driven out due to population pressure, inter-racial conflicts and political events. Though some of the people later identified with the Meiteis, most of them didn’t submit to the Meiteis to retain a separate identity and language. A great majority of the speakers fled away from Manipur and took refuge in Assam, Tripura, Sylhet, and Cachar during eighteen and nineteenth century due to internal conflicts among the princes of Manipur and due to Burmese attack. This Language is now spoken in parts of Assam, Tripura, Manipur( Jiribam, Bishnupur, Ningthaukhong)) in India, in Bangladesh, in Burma and some other overseas countries. Continue Reading